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10 for December 10th. - You don't know me. [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
randomposting

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10 for December 10th. [Dec. 10th, 2008|06:16 pm]
randomposting
[mood |soresore]
[music |Commercial]

Hey guys!

Sorry I've been afk for a little while. I managed to injure my shoulder and haven't been much in the mood to type. All the same, those of you that requested a card from me, they went out today and yesterday so you should be receiving them shortly. :)

And no worries, if you missed out this year, I anticipate this is going to be an additional tradition to my holiday'ing in the foreseeable future. :)


I hope you're all doing well and not going too badly into the debts because of the Holidays.

So here's some seasonal facts to make up for the time I was away:

1. An average household in America will mail out 28 Christmas cards each year and see 28 eight cards return in their place.

2. As early as 1822, the postmaster in Washington, D.C. was worried by the amount of extra mail at Christmas time. His preferred solution to the problem was to limit by law the number of cards a person could send. Even though commercial cards were not available at that time, people were already sending so many home-made cards that sixteen extra postmen had to be hired in the city.

3. Christmas trees are edible. Many parts of pines, spruces, and firs can be eaten. The needles are a good source of vitamin C. Pine nuts, or pine cones, are also a good source of nutrition. (But don't do this, okay? lol. It seems toxic and I'd hate for any of you to get sick.

4. Following Princess Diana's tragic death in 1997, the Ty toy company, famous in the late 1990s for its popular Beanie Baby line of beanbag animals, issued a "Princess" bear in tribute. The royal purple Beanie, bearing an embroidered white rose on its chest, became so desired that at Christmas time, American collectors were willing to spend up to $300 for one on the secondary market.

5. Frumenty was a spiced porridge, enjoyed by both rich and poor. It is thought to be the forerunner of modern Christmas puddings. It has its origins in a Celtic legend of the harvest god Dagda, who stirred a porridge made up of all the good things of the Earth.

6. In 1996, Christmas caroling was banned at two major malls in Pensacola, Florida. Apparently, shoppers and merchants complained the carolers were too loud and took up too much space.

7. In Victorian England, turkeys were popular for Christmas dinners. Some of the birds were raised in Norfolk, and taken to market in London. To get them to London, the turkeys were supplied with boots made of sacking or leather. The turkeys were walked to market. The boots protected their feet from the frozen mud of the road. Boots were not used for geese: instead, their feet were protected with a covering of tar.

8. Two hundred years before the birth of Christ, the Druids used mistletoe to celebrate the coming of winter. They would gather this evergreen plant that is parasitic upon other trees and used it to decorate their homes. They believed the plant had special healing powers for everything from female infertility to poison ingestion. Scandinavians also thought of mistletoe as a plant of peace and harmony. They associated mistletoe with their goddess of love, Frigga. The custom of kissing under the mistletoe probably derived from this belief. The early church banned the use of mistletoe in Christmas celebrations because of its pagan origins. Instead, church fathers suggested the use of holly as an appropriate substitute for Christmas greenery.

9. The original Santa Claus, St. Nicholas, was born in Turkey in the 4th century. He was very pious from an early age, devoting his life to Christianity. He became widely known for his generosity for the poor. But the Romans held him in contempt. He was imprisoned and tortured. But when Constantine became emperor of Rome, he allowed Nicholas to go free. Constantine became a Christian and convened the Council of Nicaea in 325. Nicholas was a delegate to the council. He is especially noted for his love of children and for his generosity. He is the patron saint of sailors, Sicily, Greece, and Russia. He is also, of course, the patron saint of children. The Dutch kept the legend of St. Nicholas alive. In 16th century Holland, Dutch children would place their wooden shoes by the hearth in hopes that they would be filled with a treat. The Dutch spelled St. Nicholas as Sint Nikolaas, which became corrupted to Sinterklaas, and finally, in Anglican, to Santa Claus. In 1822, Clement C. Moore composed his famous poem, "A Visit from St. Nick," which was later published as "The Night Before Christmas." Moore is credited with creating the modern image of Santa Claus as a jolly fat man in a red suit.

10. The Japanese term for Christmas, Kurisumasu Omedeto, can also be loosely translated as "Morning of the Greedy Children."

I don't know if they're true or not, but they're interesting Holiday urban legends if they're not. ;) I take no responsibility for poorly researched factoids in this post. hehe. ;)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_AyaRGEDXAQ&feature=user

And how to tie a bow-tie.
linkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: koibito_moon
2008-12-11 12:43 am (UTC)
Kurisumasu Omedetou literaly means christmas congratulations. so,I would translate it as happy/merry christmas.

:D I'm not sure where you got the morning of the greedy children, but it made me laugh, I think I was one of those greedy children, I'm an only child. hehe. I'm learning Japanese. :P I know you said you are not sure if they are true or not, I'm not complaining, I thought you might want to know... now I watch the youtube video :P
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-11 05:45 am (UTC)
LOL, the other version is funnier. ;) But good to know.
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[User Picture]From: watergal
2008-12-11 12:44 am (UTC)
Herding turkeys?? Not my idea of fun. Especially in December.
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-11 05:46 am (UTC)
Seeeriously.
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From: christinaathena
2008-12-11 02:28 am (UTC)
6. In 1996, Christmas caroling was banned at two major malls in Pensacola, Florida. Apparently, shoppers and merchants complained the carolers were too loud and took up too much space.

I lived in Pensacola in 1996, and I don't remember anything about carolers being banned, so I'm a bit skeptical of that one, cause I think I'd remember something like that. ^_^ Google's only turning up other trivia pages on blogs and the like for that. Hmm ...

(Incidentally, "two major malls in Pensacola, Florida" amuses me, as there are/were [I seem to vaguely recall that one shut down a few years ago] ONLY two malls in the city - and only one of them is any decent size. ^_^)
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-11 05:47 am (UTC)
lol, hence my statement about not being able to be blamed for any errors. ;) I had a feeling these weren't all right, but fascinating none the less. hehe
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[User Picture]From: tjoel2
2008-12-11 02:45 am (UTC)
Hope you're feeling better! :}
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-11 05:48 am (UTC)
Thanks sweetie. Not yet. It's still hurting. :( Stupid body.
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[User Picture]From: vjgyo
2008-12-11 04:38 am (UTC)
hope your shoulder gets better
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-11 05:48 am (UTC)
Thanks love, me too!
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[User Picture]From: monicarnsg
2008-12-11 04:47 am (UTC)
I have been sending loads of cards our for years and barely get more than five or so back. This year I am boycotting Christmas cards! I'm not sending cards to anyone who hasn't sent one to me first! I know, not very Christmas-y, but I don't care!
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-11 05:49 am (UTC)
lol, aww. *hugs*

I was a bad sender last year. Meant to send out more but totally didn't.
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[User Picture]From: insane_hope
2008-12-11 04:50 am (UTC)
You can eat pine needles, I know I used to when I was a kid, still do sometimes. what, the dog used to! I doesn't feel like christmas here, maybe its just thecollege thing.
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-11 05:49 am (UTC)
What do they taste like?

*hugs*
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[User Picture]From: ellensparkleyes
2008-12-11 06:01 am (UTC)
hope your shoulder's completely healed. and those poor geese!
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-11 06:02 am (UTC)
Thanks love, and not yet. :(
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[User Picture]From: amazingadrian
2008-12-11 06:19 am (UTC)
Aww, I missed it! I was just logging in to send you my address if you where still taking them.

How's this, want to do a card exchange? If you send me one, I'll send you one! (not like I wasn't going to do that anyways, lol!)

Also, sucks to hear about your shoulder. I hope you get well soon!
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-11 06:20 am (UTC)
Thanks babe. :) Email me your addy. I suppose I can do one more. ;)
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[User Picture]From: aongeli
2008-12-11 02:08 pm (UTC)
Even if parts of the many types of cut evergreen trees available for purchase at this time of year were edible and healthy, I wouldn't recommend it. I used to live near tree farms and work at a summer camp that shared land with fir tree farms, and we were always advised to not even touch them and then put our hands near our faces for all the chemicals they spray them with while they are growing. Should be rained off before the christmas season, but still, those chemicals are in there.
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-11 07:09 pm (UTC)
Yeah, very good point.
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[User Picture]From: randomdan
2008-12-12 02:03 pm (UTC)
"1. An average household in America will mail out 28 Christmas cards each year and see 28 eight cards return in their place."

I should hope so. If the average household sent out 28 but only got back 2 then the postal service would be quite a mess and awash with undelivered letters. If they received 28 but sent out fewer then there would have to be a lot of homeless people sending cards to compensate.

Oh math/statistics, you are so useful. :x
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[User Picture]From: randomposting
2008-12-12 07:43 pm (UTC)
lol. ;)
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